"When in Rome": Ancient Roman Coin Necklace (Constans)
"When in Rome": Ancient Roman Coin Necklace (Constans)
"When in Rome": Ancient Roman Coin Necklace (Constans)
"When in Rome": Ancient Roman Coin Necklace (Constans)
"When in Rome": Ancient Roman Coin Necklace (Constans)
"When in Rome": Ancient Roman Coin Necklace (Constans)
"When in Rome": Ancient Roman Coin Necklace (Constans)
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"When in Rome": Ancient Roman Coin Necklace (Constans)

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Coin: Constans

Patina: Bronze/Green

Detail: Very detailed bust and lettering on front/altar and lettering on back

Cord/Chain: Leather (Natural Grey)

Closure: Adjustable double slipknot 

About these coins:

Meet Flavius Julius Constans! He was the son of Constantine I, and became a co-caeser with his brothers after his father's death. He was the Roman Emperor in from 337-350 CE (and ruled Roman territory in Italy, Illycrium, Africa, and eventually Gual). This coin would have been minted from 340 until his death in 350 (he lived to be about 30). 

If history has taught us anything, it's that one should NOT share power with their siblings. He ended up killing his older brother in a military power squabble (that's how he got Gaul), and was later killed by a military commander in Gaul. His younger brother (who disliked him), Constantine II, eventually replaced him.

These are Roman Imperial bronze or copper coins from 27 BCE to around 400 CE.

BCE = Before Common Era and CE = Common Era. If you want to go old school, you can say BC (Before Christ) and AD (Anno Domini). Either way, these coins are anywhere from 1,700 - 2000 years old and would have been around during early Christianity and the Roman occupation around much of the globe.

I love that people outside of the Americas can find hoardes of Roman coins buried literally in their backyards. You can find Roman coins spread across Europe. You can find them in the UK. You can even find them in the Middle East, Asia, and Africa! Those imperialistic bastards really got around.

People would bury their wealth because a) there were no banks and b) people, like those those in armies, moved around a lot (and it wasn't always safe to carry around large amounts of wealth.). Subsequently, if those people died or just forgot where they stashed their goods, those coins remained buried, and many ancient caches are still uncovered nowadays!